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The Great American History Fact-Finder
by Pam Cornelison and Ted Yanak

The Great American History Fact-Finder
"This is a treasure chest of useful information. I intend to keep it handy on my desk, as I am sure others will as well." — Joseph Nye, Harvard University, author of Soft Power: The Means to Success in World Politics
Completely revised and expanded with 200 new entries, The Great American History Fact-Finder covers a wide spectrum of American history and culture, including political events, military history, sports, arts, entertainment, landmark legislation, and business. Here is essential information on everything from the Mayflower to space exploration, from the dot-com boom and bust to the Stanley Cup. The book's 2,200 concise entries, arranged from A to Z, bring our nation's past into sharp focus while offering just plain useful facts about the well known and not so well known:

• Who ran on the campaign slogan "Don't swap horses in midstream"?

• In what year was the Super Bowl first played?

• Where did the westbound and eastbound tracks of the transcontinental railroad meet?

• When did events at Yalta, the Bay of Pigs, and Kent State take place?

• What did the swimmer Gertrude Ederle achieve in 1926?


Answers: Lincoln; 1967; Promontory Point, Utah; February 1945, April 1961, May 1970; Ederle was the first woman to swim the English Channel.



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Great American History Fact Finder

XML with XSL

2.2 MB

18 JPG files, 1.34 MB

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Sample Entry:

Tarbell, Ida (1857-1944), historian, journalist, and reformer. Tarbell became famous as a leading MUCKRAKER through her series of articles in McClure's magazine on political and corporate corruption. Her History of the Standard Oil Company (1904) led to the outlawing of monopolies in the United States. She also wrote biographies of Napoleon I and Abraham Lincoln, and an autobiography, All in the Day's Work (1929).

Tariff of Abominations (1828), a federal statute placing high tariffs on imports. The highest tariff imposed in America up to that time, it was labeled the "Tariff of Abominations" by southern leaders, who bitterly opposed the bill and spoke of secession. HENRY CLAY worked out the COMPROMISE TARIFF OF 1833, which reduced tariffs gradually until 1842.