Houghton Mifflin Trade and Reference Division
HMH BOOKS ELECTRONIC LICENSING ALL TITLES TECHNOLOGY ABOUT US CONTACT US


Home
General Reference
Dictionaries
Education
Business/Finance
Hobbies/Sports
Science
All Databases
Featured Consumer Products
Technical Support
The American Heritage® Dictionary for Learners of English
by Editors of The American Heritage® Dictionaries

The American Heritage® Dictionary for Learners of English
Designed for the needs of ESL students, this dictionary is an indispensable resource for anyone wanting to learn and use American English effectively. It has an up-to-date word list with definitions adapted from The American Heritage® Dictionary, abundant sample sentences and phrases, and an easy-to-use pronunciation system. Features include Word Building and Usage Notes and a new Reference and Study Guide that offers help with basic grammar and style.



Key Features:

• Clear and precise definitions adapted from the acclaimed The American Heritage® Dictionary
• Extensive vocabulary, fully up-to-date for the twenty-first century
• Abundant idioms and example sentences
• Word Building Notes and Usage Notes with expanded information on vocabulary
• More comprehensive grammar information than any comparable dictionary
• A wealth of informative photographs and illustrations
• New Reference and Study Guide offering convenient help with basic English grammar, style, and much more.



Technical Specs:

Product
Available Electronic
Version(s)

File Size

Images,
File Types & Sizes

Other Associated Files

American Heritage® Dictionary for Learners of English, The

XML with XSL FILTER VERSION

12 MB

1 JPG file, 127 KB
AUDIO PRONUNCIATION [WAV] FILES AVAILABLE

DTD
INDEX



Sample Entries:

lone (ln) adj. Alone; solitary: a lone traveler on the deserted road.
HOMONYMS: lone, loan (something lent)

nei•ther (n' thr or n' thr) adj. Not either; not one nor the other: Neither shoe fits comfortably. - pron. Not either one; not the one nor the other: Neither of the shoes fits. - conj. 1. Not either; not in either case. Used with nor: They had neither seen the movie nor read the book. 2. Also not; nor: If you won't go, neither will I.
USAGE: neither When you use neither as a conjunction, you should follow it with nor rather than or: Neither rain nor snow stopped her from going for a walk every day.