A Luminous Republic

A Luminous Republic

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A new novel from a Spanish literary star about the arrival of feral children to a tropical city in Argentina, and the quest to stop them from pulling the place into chaos.

San Cristóbal was an unremarkable city—small, newly prosperous, contained by rain forest and river. But then the children arrived.

No one knew where they came from: thirty-two kids, seemingly born of the jungle, speaking an unknown language. At first they scavenged, stealing food and money and absconding to the trees. But their transgressions escalated to violence, and then the city’s own children began defecting to join them. Facing complete collapse, municipal forces embark on a hunt to find the kids before the city falls into irreparable chaos.

Narrated by the social worker who led the hunt, A Luminous Republic is a suspenseful, anguished fable that “could be read as Lord of the Flies seen from the other side, but that would rob Barba of the profound originality of his world” (Juan Gabriel Vásquez).

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  • Format: Paperback

  • ISBN-13/EAN: 9781328589347

  • ISBN-10: 132858934X

  • Pages: 208

  • Price: $14.99

  • Publication Date: 04/14/2020

  • Carton Quantity: 24

Andrés Barba
Author

Andrés Barba

ANDRÉS BARBA is the award-winning author of numerous books, including Such Small Hands and The Right Intention. He was one of Granta's Best Young Spanish novelists and received the Premio Herralde for Luminous Republic, which will be translated into twenty languages.
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L
Translator

Lisa Dillman

LISA DILLMAN translates from Spanish and Catalan and teaches in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at Emory University. Some of her recent translations include Signs Preceding the End of the World, by Yuri Herrera, which won the 2016 Best Translated Book Award; Such Small Hands and Rain Over Madrid, by Andrés Barba; Monastery, co-translated with Daniel Hahn, by Eduardo Halfon; and Salting the Wound, by Víctor del Árbol.
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  • reviews

    Winner of the Premio Herralde 

     

    A Luminous Republic is a terrifying masterpiece. To lay bare with such stunning precision the nature of self-obsession – the viciousness with which any one of us might respond to that which we don’t understand – marks Andrés Barba as a writer of extraordinary talent. He has created a small, simple story and within it buried immense complexity and truth.” 

    —Omar El Akkad, bestselling author of American War 

     

    “One of the best books I’ve ever read . . . There is an air of magic, black and white, lingering around every page of this epic novel of 192 pages, like gun smoke after a shootout. I say ‘epic’ because it feels as full, as dense with duration, as if it were 1,000 pages long, but can be read in an evening . . . This is a book at once heavy and light, Caliban and Ariel, somber and comic. It will open your eyes.” 

    —Edmund White, from his foreword to A Luminous Republic 

     

    “A fever dream of a novel with sharp-as-knives insights; deft and cutting.” 

    —Lauren Beukes, author of The Shining Girls and Broken Monsters 

     

    “Disturbing and melancholy, disquieting without tricks and beautiful without artifice, A Luminous Republic is an engrossing tale of unusual moral precision. It could be read as a Lord of the Flies seen from the other side, but then we would be robbing Andrés Barba of the profound originality of his world, which is unlike anything the reader might have encountered. A triumph.” 

    —Juan Gabriel Vásquez, author of The Sound of Things Falling and The Shape of the Ruins 

      

    “Barba conjures the primal impulses of childhood with terrifying precision. In its questioning of violence as both threat and seduction, A Luminous Republic is both a rapturous fable and a ruinous forecast of the havoc that comes from civic inaction.” 

    —Idra Novey, author of Those Who Knew and Ways to Disappear 

     

    “At first this book will scare you, but after that you feel something much deeper, disturbing and luminous.” 

    —Samanta Schweblin, author of Fever Dream and Mouthful of Birds  

      

    “Andrés Barba has written a Spanish novel that seems Latin American and that is nourished by the best Anglo-Saxon tradition: a wicked fable on childhood that is also a suspense novel that plays with the mechanisms of fantastic literature. Highly enjoyable and profound.” 

    —Juan Pablo Villalobos, author of Down the Rabbit Hole and I’ll Sell You a Dog 

     

    “In this award-winning novel, we find one of the nuclear elements of Andrés Barba's narrative world: the investigation—incisive, sharp, unsparing—of affections, emotions and feelings…This novel is as distressing as it is illuminating, with a strange beauty in its final epiphany.” 

    El País 

      

    “This is a magnificent book sparkling with profound, indeterminate, fundamental elements.” 

    El Mundo – El Cultural 

      

    “Barba is a master of giving a novel the right size to achieve its objectives. This is the best work I’ve read from him . . . It’s impossible to put this book down. It goes one step beyond William Golding’s Lord of the Flies . . . I whole-heartedly recommend this read.” 

    ABC Cultural 

      

    “The book of the week. Barba has written a heartbreaking novel on the dark collective hope.” 

    El Periódico 

      

    "Barba is prolific, as multifaceted as he is rigorous. With Luminous Republic, the author has gone further than ever . . . Brilliant." 

    La Vanguardia 

      

    Praise for Andrés Barba’s Such Small Hands 

     

    “Chilling . . . Barba inhabits the minds of children with an exactitude that seems to me so uncanny as to be almost sinister . . . This is as effective a ghost story as any I have read, but lying behind the shocks is a meditation on language and its power to bind or loosen thought and behavior.” 

    —Sarah Perry, The Guardian 

      

    “Barba is intensely alive to the shifting, even Janus-faced nature of strong feeling.” 

    —R.O. Kwon,San Francisco Chronicle 

      

    Such Small Hands is a magnificently chilling antidote to society’s reverence for ideas of infantile innocence and purity.”  

    Financial Times 

      

    “Barba’s stunning and beautiful prose helps us realize that our adult incomprehension is not absolute.” 

    Los Angeles Review of Books

  • excerpts

    When I’m asked about the thirty-two children who lost their lives in San Cristóbal, my response varies depending on the age of my interlocutor. If we’re the same age, I say that understanding is simply a matter of piecing together that which was previously seen as disjointed; if they’re younger, I ask if they believe in bad omens. Almost always they’ll say no, as if doing so would mean they had little regard for freedom. I ask no more questions and then tell them my version of events, because this is all I have and because it would be pointless to try to convince them that believing, or not, is less about their regard for freedom than their naïve faith in justice. If I were a little more forthright or a little less of a coward, I’d always begin my story the same way: Almost everyone gets what they deserve, and bad omens do exist. Oh, they most certainly do. 

     

    The day I arrived in San Cristóbal, twenty years ago now, I was a young civil servant with the Department of Social Affairs in Estepí who’d just been promoted. In the space of a few years I’d gone from being a skinny kid with a law degree to a recently married man whose happiness gave him a slightly more attractive air than he no doubt would otherwise have had. Life struck me as a simple series of adversities, relatively easy to overcome, which led to a death that was perhaps not simple but was inevitable and thus didn’t merit thinking about. I didn’t realize, back then, that in fact that was what happiness was, what youth was and what death was. And although I wasn’t in essence mistaken about anything, I was making mistakes about everything. I’d fallen in love with a violin teacher from San Cristóbal who was three years my senior, mother of a nine-year-old girl. They were both named Maia and both had intense eyes, tiny noses and brown lips that I thought were the pinnacle of beauty. At times I felt they’d chosen me during some secret meeting, and I was so happy to have fallen for the pair of them that when I was offered the opportunity to transfer to San Cristóbal, I ran to Maia’s house to tell her and asked her to marry me then and there. 

     

    I was offered the post because, two years earlier in Estepí, I had developed a social integration program for indigenous communities. The idea was simple and the program proved to be an effective model; it consisted of granting the indigenous exclusive rights to farm certain specific products. For that city we chose oranges and then charged the indigenous community with supplying almost five thousand people. The program nearly descended into chaos when it came to distribution, but in the end the community rallied and after a period of readjustment created a small and very solvent cooperative which to this day is, to a large degree, self-financing. 

     

    The program was so successful that the state government contacted me through the Commission of Indigenous Settlements, requesting that I reproduce it with San Cristóbal’s three thousand Ñeê inhabitants. They offered me housing and a managerial post in the Department of Social Affairs. In no time, Maia had started giving classes at the small music school in her hometown once more. She wouldn’t admit it, but I knew that she was eager to return as a prosperous woman to the city she’d been forced by necessity to leave. The post even covered the girl’s schooling (I always referred to her as “the girl,” and when speaking to her directly, simply “girl”) and offered a salary that would allow us to begin saving. What more could I have asked for? I struggled to contain my joy and asked Maia to tell me about the jungle, the river Eré, the streets of San Cristóbal .?.?. When she spoke, I felt as if I were heading deeper and deeper into thick, suffocating vegetation before abruptly coming upon a heavenly Eden. My imagination may not have been particularly creative, but no one can say I wasn’t optimistic. 

     

    We arrived in San Cristóbal on April 13, 1993. The heat was muggy and intense and the sky completely clear. As we drove into town in our old station wagon, I saw in the distance for the first time the vast brown expanse of water that was the river Eré and San Cristóbal’s jungle, an impenetrable green monster. I was unaccustomed to the subtropical climate and my body had been covered in sweat from the moment we got off the highway and took the red sand road leading to the city.

Available Resources

Related Categories

  • Format: Paperback

  • ISBN-13/EAN: 9781328589347

  • ISBN-10: 132858934X

  • Pages: 208

  • Price: $14.99

  • Publication Date: 04/14/2020

  • Carton Quantity: 24

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