Die with Zero: Getting All You Can from Your Money and Your Life
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Die with Zero: Getting All You Can from Your Money and Your Life

By:  Bill Perkins

Narrated by:  Bill Perkins

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A WALL STREET JOURNAL BESTSELLER

A Common-Sense Guide to Living Rich….Instead of Dying Rich

Imagine if by the time you died, you did everything you were told to. You worked hard, saved your money, and looked forward to financial freedom when you retired.

The only thing you wasted along the way was…your life.

Die with Zero presents a startling new and provocative philosophy as well as practical guide on how to get the most out of your money—and out of your life. It’s intended for those who place lifelong memorable experiences far ahead of simply making and accumulating money for one’s so-called Golden Years.

In short, Bill Perkins wants to rescue you from over-saving and under-living. Regardless of your age, Die with Zero will teach you Perkins’ plan for optimizing your life, stage by stage, so you’re fully engaged and enjoying what you’ve worked and saved for.

You’ll discover how to maximize your lifetime memorable moments with “experience bucketing,” how to convert your earnings into priceless memories by following your “net worth curve,” and find out how to navigate whether to invest in, or delay, a meaningful adventure based on your “spend curve” and “personal interest rate.”

Using his own life experiences as well as the inspiring stories and cautionary tales of others—and drawing on eye-opening insights about time, money, and happiness from psychological science and behavioral finance —Perkins makes a timely, convincing, and contrarian case for living large.

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  • Format: Audiobook

  • ISBN-13/EAN: 9780358310365

  • ISBN-10: 0358310369

  • Price: $19.95

  • Publication Date: 07/28/2020

Bill Perkins
Author

Bill Perkins

Called the "Last Cowboy" of hedge funds by the Wall Street Journal, Bill Perkins is considered one of the most successful energy traders in history. He's reported to have generated more than $1 billion for his previous firm during a five-year period.   After studying electrical engineering at the University of Iowa, Perkins trained on Wall Street and later moved to Houston, Texas, where he made a fortune as an energy trader.   At the age of 51, Perkins's professional life includes work as a hedge fund manager with more than $120 million in assets, Hollywood film producer, high-stakes tournament poker player, and the resident "Indiana Jones" for several charities.   Perkins manages this via smartphone on his yacht in the U.S. Virgin Islands, while traveling the world with close friends and family.
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Bill Perkins
Narrated by

Bill Perkins

Called the "Last Cowboy" of hedge funds by the Wall Street Journal, Bill Perkins is considered one of the most successful energy traders in history. He's reported to have generated more than $1 billion for his previous firm during a five-year period.   After studying electrical engineering at the University of Iowa, Perkins trained on Wall Street and later moved to Houston, Texas, where he made a fortune as an energy trader.   At the age of 51, Perkins's professional life includes work as a hedge fund manager with more than $120 million in assets, Hollywood film producer, high-stakes tournament poker player, and the resident "Indiana Jones" for several charities.   Perkins manages this via smartphone on his yacht in the U.S. Virgin Islands, while traveling the world with close friends and family.
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  • reviews

    “[T]he ideas contained within are worth pondering for a future that may eventually include a return to a somewhat normal financial life….So why is this book by Bill Perkins…worth your time? Because it gets to the heart of two extremely important issues that you may be thinking about during these strange times: why you save and how you live….It’s an intriguing idea.” – New York Times 

     

    “He’s not offering a steady plan to save for the future while still enjoying your life; he’s offering ways to be more present now, so you don’t look back on would’ves, could’ves, and should’ves later in life.” – SUCCESS Magazine 

     

    "If you're wondering what the secret sauce is to living your life to the fullest at every stage without running your resources dry, then crack open this practical, timely book.” 

    —Barbara Corcoran, Shark on Shark Tank, Founder of The Corcoran Group 

      

    “Bill Perkins' Die with Zero opens up a completely different avenue of thinking to realize that your life can be maximized through memorable experiences. Why wait?  Being present is a priority. This book provides an amazing blueprint to living your life while using your resources correctly!" 

    —Kevin Hart, Award-Winning Comedian and Actor 

      

    "Bill Perkins' Die With Zero teaches us how to trade off money for something of real value — life's moments of pure joy, whose memories are our ultimate treasure." 

    —Laurence Kotlikoff, Professor of Economics, Boston University, best-selling author of Get What's Yours 

      

    "I really believe in this philosophy. You should read it and see all the different methods and philosophies and ways to figure this out in your own life.” 

    —James Altucher, American hedge-fund manager, best-selling author, podcaster and entrepreneur 

      

    "This book brilliantly gives one a roadmap for living life over planning for death, for making a difference while you're here to see that difference become real, and for generating priceless memory dividends with friends and family which far exceeds the value of any portfolio. Read it and reap a richer, fuller and more exciting life." 

    —W. Randall Jones, Managing Director, Patriarch Partners, LLC and author of The Richest Man inTown 

      

    "In Die with Zero, Perkins presents a life-altering argument that we really need to start focusing on living our richest lives now, rather than waiting for our so-called golden years. I wholeheartedly agree. Read this book, change your thinking, and wake up to accumulating experiences now before it's too late." 

    —David Bach,New York Times best-selling author, including The Automatic Millionaire and The LatteFactor

  • excerpts

    Optimize Your Life

    Rule No. 1: Maximize your positive life experiences.

    In October of 2008, Erin and her husband, John, were successful lawyers with three young children when they learned that John had clear-cell sarcoma, a rare and rapidly growing cancer of the body’s soft tissues. “Nobody thought that a healthy 35-year-old would have a tumor the size of a baseball,” Erin recalls. So no one suspected cancer until the tumor had spread to John’s back and leg bones. “We didn’t understand how serious his condition was until he had an X-ray and it was lit up like a Christmas tree,” Erin says. The grim diagnosis terrified and overwhelmed her. And with John too sick to work, the full burden of taking care of the family physically and financially fell to her. It was too much for one person to bear. 

         I had been friends with Erin since we were kids, so I wanted to do everything I could to make the situation less horrible. “Stop what you’re doing,” I told her, “and spend time as a family while John still can.” I also offered to help with the costs. 

         It turns out I was preaching to the choir: Erin had already been thinking about quitting work to focus on what really mattered. And that’s what she did. So at their home in Iowa, between John’s cancer treatments, the couple enjoyed the simple pleasures of each other’s company: They’d go to the park, watch movies, play video games, and pick their kids up after school together. 

         In November, when local doctors had done everything they could, without success, Erin found a clinical trial in Boston, where she and John made several trips to undergo the experimental treatment, using their free time to go on some of the city’s historic tours while John could still walk. All too soon, though, their hope faded, and one day John broke down at the thought of everything he’d miss, from watching his children grow up to passing the years with Erin. 

         John died in January of 2009, just three months after his diagnosis. Looking back at that period, Erin recalls the trauma and devastation, but she is glad she quit her job to be home with John. 

         Most people would have done the same in these circumstances. Death wakes people up, and the closer it gets, the more awake and aware we become. When the end is near, we suddenly start thinking, What the hell am I doing? Why did I wait this long? Until then, most of us go through life as if we had all the time in the world. 

         Some of that behavior is rational. It would be foolish to live every day as if it were your last: You wouldn’t bother to work, or study for a test, or visit the dentist. So it makes sense to delay gratification to some extent, because that pays off in the long run. But the sad truth is that too many people delay gratification for too long, or indefinitely. They put off what they want to do until it’s too late, saving money for experiences they will never enjoy. Living as if your life were infinite is the opposite of taking the long view: It’s terribly shortsighted. 

         Clearly, the story of Erin and John is an extreme case. Advanced clear-cell sarcoma is rare, and death was staring this couple in the face much more starkly than it does for most people. Yet the challenge that their situation presented is common to everyone: Everyone’s health generally declines with time, and sooner or later we all die, so the question we all must answer is how to make the most of our finite time on earth. 

         Put that way, it sounds like a lofty, philosophical question—but that’s not how I see it. I’m trained as an engineer and made my fortune on the strength of my analytical skills, so I see this question as an optimization problem: how to maximize fulfillment while minimizing waste.

    Everyone’s Problem

    We all face some version of this question. Of course, the dollar amounts differ from person to person, often dramatically, but the core question is the same for all of us: What’s the best way to allocate our life energy before we die? 

         I have thought about this question for many years, going back to when I was barely earning enough to live on, and over time I’ve come up with several guiding principles that make sense. These are the ideas behind this book. For example, some experiences can be enjoyed only at certain times: Most people can’t go water-skiing in their nineties. Another principle: Although we all have at least the potential to make more money in the future, we can never go back and recapture time that is now gone. So it makes no sense to let opportunities pass us by for fear of squandering our money. Squandering our lives should be a much greater worry. 

         I’m a big believer in these ideas, and I preach them whenever I get the chance. Whether it’s a 25-year-old afraid of pursuing her dream career and instead settling for a safe but soul-crushing job, or a 60-year-old multimillionaire who keeps working long hours in order to sock away more money for retirement instead of enjoying the great wealth he’s already accrued, I hate seeing people wasting their resources and putting off living life fully now—and I tell them so. As much as I possibly can, I also practice what I preach. Granted, sometimes I’m like a fat football coach on the sidelines, failing to follow my own advice. But when I catch myself doing that, I make corrections, some of which you’ll read about later in this book. None of us are perfect, but I do my best to walk the talk.

    We Are All Alike, We Are All Different

    Living life fully takes many forms. For example, I love to travel and I love poker, so I take lots of trips, some of them to play in poker tournaments. This means I spend a big percentage of my savings each year on travel and on poker. But don’t get me wrong: I am not an advocate for everyone spending their savings on travel, let alone poker. What I am an advocate for is deciding what makes you happy and then converting your money into the experiences you choose. 

         Those enjoyable experiences naturally vary from person to person; some people are active and adventurous, others prefer to stay close to home. Some get great satisfaction from splurging on themselves and their families and friends, while others prefer to spend their time and money on those less fortunate than themselves. And, of course, we can enjoy a mix of experiences. As much as I love to travel, I also like to spend my time and money to advance causes I care about, from railing against bank bailouts to bringing in hurricane relief to my neighbors on the U.S. Virgin Islands. So I’m certainly not trying to tell you that one set of experiences is better than another; instead, you should choose your experiences deliberately and purposefully rather than living life on autopilot, as too many of us do. 

         Of course, it’s more complicated than just knowing what makes you happy and spending your money on those experiences at every moment. That’s because our ability to enjoy different kinds of experiences changes throughout our lifetimes. Think about it: If your parents took you along on a tour of Italy when you were a toddler, how much did you get out of that expensive vacation, besides maybe a lifelong love of gelato? Or consider the other extreme: How much do you think you’ll enjoy climbing Rome&rsq...

Available Resources

Related Categories

  • Format: Audiobook

  • ISBN-13/EAN: 9780358310365

  • ISBN-10: 0358310369

  • Price: $19.95

  • Publication Date: 07/28/2020

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