The Headmaster's Dilemma

The Headmaster's Dilemma

In The Headmaster’s Dilemma, Louis Auchincloss revisits the prep school world of his most famous novel. That book, The Rector of Justin, published in 1964, took the form of a fictional biography, giving the reader the full life story of a much beloved and revered, if also feared, headmaster of an exclusive New England prep school. In The Headmaster’s Dilemma, we see up close what happens when a school’s ideals and founding principles collide with the exigencies of change.The Headmaster’s Dilemma is the story of Michael Sayre, the handsome, avant-garde headmaster of Averhill, the great New England prep school as he is faced with a school administrator’s worst nightmare: a lawsuit brought by fervent parents in response to an incident involving their son and an upperclassman. To make matters worse, Michael is losing support from both the board of trustees -- led by the conniving Donald Spencer -- and senior faculty members. With the help of his supportive wife, Michael attempts to right these wrongs, while keeping Averhill’s best interests in mind.

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  • Format: eBook

  • ISBN-13/EAN: 9780547630540

  • ISBN-10: 0547630549

  • Pages: 192

  • Price: $16.99

  • Publication Date: 09/10/2007

  • Carton Quantity: 1

Louis Auchincloss
Author

Louis Auchincloss

Louis Auchincloss was honored in the year 2000 as a “Living Landmark” by the New York Landmarks Conservancy. During his long career he wrote more than sixty books, including the story collection Manhattan Monologues and the novel The Rector of Justin. The former president of the Academy of Arts and Letters, he resided in New York City until his death in January 2010.
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  • excerpts

    1

    Michael Sayre thought afterward that it had all started on an early spring afternoon in 1975 when he and Ione and Donald Spencer were sitting in the small rose garden behind the headmaster’s house having coffee after Sunday lunch. They had not eaten in the big school dining room at the main table because Donald Spencer, chairman of the trustees, had only limited time for what he had termed an important visit and had requested a meeting alone with the headmaster and his wife.

    The residence that rose above them was a charming old New England manor house, and the great boarding school of which it was the center, to match it, had been tastefully conceived as a colonial village of sober and regular white house fronts grouped about a shimmering oblong lawn studded with elms and dominated at one end by the chapel, a chaste meeting house with a tall spire. As the institution had grown and expanded through the decades, other and larger buildings had been added and playing fields lain out, but these had been sufficiently distanced from the original village atmosphere of plain living and high thinking evoked by the school founder in the 1880s. Averhill, for all its four hundred students and great modern reputation, was still considered by many of its alumni and parents as a stalwart fortress against the creeping vulgarity of the day.

    And so Michael liked to think of it. He had been headmaster for three years now, appointed as a result of the successful efforts of younger members of the board to convince the others that a leader was needed to make some adaptations to the exigencies of change in educational thinking. And he had already achieved some of these: girls had just been admitted; the limits of the courses widened. He had come to Averhill with a considerable reputation as a liberal; he had been the admired editor of a popular radical newspaper and a nationally known protester of the war in Vietnam, and although some of the more conservative of the school trustees had gagged at his appointment, the general feeling was that if change had to come it had better come through one of their own. Michael himself was a graduate of the school where he had had a brilliant record, and he was supposed to have a deep concern for the original ideals of the institution. It also didn’t hurt that he was possessed of striking good looks and had a beautiful, charming wife.

    Yet what did all this avail to alleviate the disgust that he felt at what Donald Spencer was now proposing? And the worst of it was that not a single item in the chairman’s grandiose scheme was in the least objectionable. It was the case of the whole being greater than the sum of its parts. Much greater.

    What Spencer was offering was simply a major addition to the school plant, the cost of which would be provided by his own fortune and those of his wealthy partners and friends. There would be a huge new gymnasium with every conceivable modern appliance, a hockey rink, a nine- hole golf course, a ski run, a swimming pool, new tennis and squash courts, and a small theatre for movies and amateur dramatics. All of these structures would be outside the present campus, but they would double its area and to some extent dwarf the existing buildings.

    Spencer saw no objection to this.

    “People coming to the school for the first time would not be put off by its note of old-fashioned quaintness. They would recognize at once that they were visiting a thoroughly up-to-date institution with every modern improvement. They would see right away that they were dealing with a school that could rival Andover and Exeter in every sport that can be played!” An acute observer might have deduced from the different appearances of the headmaster and his chairman the difference in their points of view. They were the same age, forty, and had been formmates at Averhill. Michael was tall, well made, and muscularly coordinated, with a serene pale countenance, a high noble brow, wide-apart calmly gazing blue eyes, and thick long auburn hair. Women were apt to call him beautiful. Spencer was short and plump, with an egg-shaped balding head and suspicious yellow-green eyes. The two were generally supposed to have been on friendly terms, even as schoolboys, and their families had enjoyed cordial relations, yet both had always known, without admitting it to each other or to anyone else, that a mutual dislike and mistrust lay fatally between them.

    Donald had expressed no opposition when a unanimous vote of the trustees had invited Michael to take up his present position. He had voiced his objections privately to some of the older board members, but when he had seen that the battle was lost he had gone along with their desire to appear wholly agreed to the alumni. It was his habit, anyway, to conceal dissent so long as dissent served no purpose of his own. He haddddd other ways of implementing his designs. As a boy at Averhill he had proved a rare example of the power of shrewdness over muscle. A poor athlete himself and with unprepossessing looks, he had yet known how to burrow his way into the confidence of the form leaders both by flattering their prowess on the playing field and at the same time letting it be slyly known that his gimlet eye had uncovered their vulnerable spots. He was also skilled at uniting a crowd against a selected opponent by the adroit use of prejudice, thus gaining for himself the reputation of a cleansing authority. The boys had respected him and feared his bitter and wounding tongue.

    He had done well enough at Averhill and later at Harvard, but there was always an air about him that he was waiting, biding his time. His real success came after he joined the staff of his father’s great Wall Street bank and rapidly achieved a position and a fortune that made the distinguished paternal career seem small in comparison. He took over the mergers and acquisitions department and eventually carved it into a separate company that became famous for its toughness and ruthlessness even in that tough and ruthless field. If the evertriumphant Donald shed a tear over the destruction of fine old businesses or the widespread loss of jobs, he must have shed it very privately.

    It was the envy in Donald’s yellow-green eyes, an envy never expressed by his politic lips, that had first alerted Michael, even as a schoolboy, to the awareness that there were aspects of his own personality that might arouse this feeling in others. He had learned that modesty and even humility were the proper companions of self-respect from his father, the eminent and beloved professor of philosophy at Columbia, and had never regarded his own natural gifts as particularly special or given to him for any purpose other than to make the world a tiny bit better. It was hardly his fault that the kind of social success that he so effortlessly attained was precisely the kind that Donald so signally lacked and desperately wanted. Boys, and girls, too, loved Michael. They put up with Donald. One was the innermost of the “ins”; the other would always be on the circumference. Donald’s hostility had waxed with years. The alumni and older faculty members of the school might respect or even revere their famous (or infamous?) chairman for his huge gifts to Averhill, but most of the students (despite their often conservative Republican parents) and virtually all the younger teachers applauded the courageous liberalism of the popular headmaster. Donald knew it was said that he had to buy the approval of his peers; on Michael this approval seemed to rain down from heaven.

    “When are you planning to submit this project to the board, Donald?” Michael asked, placing a blueprint on the coffee table before them.

    “Just as soon as

Available Resources

Related Categories

  • Format: eBook

  • ISBN-13/EAN: 9780547630540

  • ISBN-10: 0547630549

  • Pages: 192

  • Price: $16.99

  • Publication Date: 09/10/2007

  • Carton Quantity: 1

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